Mechanic jailed for 18 months over £210,000 tax fraud

HM Revenue and Customs found 61-year-old man who failed to pay tax and National Insurance on self-employed earnings

Mechanic jailed for 18 months over £210,000 tax fraud
Wilson was caught our when investigators compared sales at Milton MOTs with DVSA records. Image: Bigstock.

A South Lanarkshire mechanic who did not declare all his earning as sole proprietor of Milton MOTs has been jailed for 18 months.

Iain Wilson evaded £208,912 in income tax and National Insurance contributions between 2009 and 2014.

His declared sales were compared with DVSA records when HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers discovered he had failed to declare all earnings.

Wilson was found guilty at Hamilton Sheriff Court in November and was last week jailed for 18 months.

“Above the law”

Joe Hendry, assistant director of the fraud investigation service at HMRC, said: “Wilson chose to lie about his income and didn’t pay the tax due on his earnings.

“He thought he could pocket the money, which should have been funding vital public services, but he was wrong and now he’s paying the price.

“Most people pay the tax they owe, when they owe it, but a small minority think they are above the law.

“No matter how well you think you’ve covered your tracks, nobody is beyond our reach.

“Tax fraud is a serious crime and I ask anyone with information about those who may be involved to contact our fraud hotline on 0800 788 887.”

5 Comments

  1. I’ve just called the fraud hot line about Costa, Google and Amazon but they said these companies use good accountants and its very time consuming to take these giants on if they don’t pay there correct amount of tax. Far easier to nail a small time mechanic.

    Reply
  2. I’m not condoning tax fraud, but well said Mark.

    Reply
  3. So instead of an attachment to earnings where he would pay the tax back-he has been given free bed and board for 18 months.
    He will probably also learn more about tax avoidance schemes in his free hotel.

    Reply
  4. So the tax payer will foot his bill for his keep. I am told it costs about £5,000 per week for stay in prison, so If I do the maths it will cost £360,000 plus £210,000 in lost fraud earnings equals a whopping £570,000 plus court costs.

    The psychology of being away from family is traumatic. Further to this when released from prisond he will have no business to go to and sadly by given a criminal record who will employ him. Hopefully he will not need rehabilation and housing. So in all of this who is the real loser and is this real justice. Agreed no one is above the Law and all earnings must be declared and due taxes paid.

    In my opinion Instead of the courts punishing and depriving him of his dignity surely Hmrc could have come to some form of agreement whereby he would be allowed to run his business and paid off the tax owing with fines by monthly terms. This way the tax payer would have hugely benefitted. Closing down a business is not the answer. Again, what about huge tax evasion by large Corporate Companies running in millions of pounds.
    By contrast there are far worst crimes committed with far less punishment.

    Reply
  5. I Totally agree with you Saidy they have just made a example of him instead of looking at the bigger picture.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Have your say!

0 0

Lost Password

Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.