Government investigates DPF removal ahead of crackdown

Research findings to better detect DPF removal could be implemented as early as next year

Government investigates DPF removal ahead of crackdown
The DfT has commissioned research on how existing or new technology can be used to detect DPF removal by measuring exhaust fumes. Image credit: Bigstock.

Ministers are facing urgent calls for reform with fears that the current MOT is failing to identify many cases of DPF removal because it only includes a ‘visual inspection’ of the hardware, which can be welded back together.

1,188 vehicles have been caught without a DPF since 2014 when ministers introduced a visual check into the MOT, according to figures obtained from the Department for Transport (DfT) by the Guardian.

The DfT has now commissioned research to better detect DPF removal by measuring exhaust fumes and any findings could be implemented as part of changes to the Roadworthiness Directive, which is scheduled to be introduced in 2017-18.

Growing problem

Dave Garratt, chief executive at the Garage Equipment Association (GEA), said: “[DPF removal] has been going on for a long time and it is probably getting progressively worse.

“The biggest hole in the MOT is that they don’t really check it.

“[Visual inspection] does not actually tell you if there is a core in the canister.”

Almost 29,000 deaths are attributed to particle pollution each year in the UK, according to a report published by DEFRA in September.

Simon Birkett, director of Clean Air in London (CAL), said: “CAL estimates that tens of thousands and more likely hundreds of thousands of diesel vehicles have been tampered with in this way.

“As more and more vehicles come out of warranty and parts wear out, this problem will grow.”

DPF deletion services

DPF warning lightA separate report, published on GW in October, found that at least 1,000 garages are offering DPF removal for as little as £250 but Paul Clark, managing director at European Exhaust and Catalyst, told GW that “DPF removal is a risky business”.

He said: “Not only will it invalidate car insurance and potentially fall under the veil of tax evasion, due to low emissions based road fund licensing, but it can damage the performance of the vehicle as well.

“At EEC we have heard many horror stories about vehicles in limp mode, engine management lights on and poor running performance and actively warn people of these dangers through our technical seminars.”

Clark explained that problematic injectors, throttle bodies, EGR valves, MAP sensors, MAF sensor and IAT sensors can all have a negative impact on the filter’s operation.

“Look at all the options available to you in the aftermarket before considering a removal, as just removing the DPF will not necessarily be the answer,” he adds.

Legal options for the motorist

Many motorists are being “cheated” with DPF deletion services, according to Klarius, who warn that often “the original fault which caused the failure of the DPF” will not have been remedied.

A Klarius spokesperson told GW: “There is a lack of technical knowledge concerning DPFs in the trade, compounded by misinformation shared amongst some mechanics.

“Research has shown the poor quality of some aftermarket DPFs with reduced filter components inside.”

“Klarius is the only manufacturer who offers the premium replacement for the price of a standard aftermarket DPF, incorporating OE sized filters which guarantee the original performance and efficiency of the vehicle is retained or even improved.”

Profitable for independents

Launched last year, an innovative new professional DPF cleaner offers garages a new alternative to DPF replacement.

Speaking to GW about the product, John Wright, garage essentials manager at GSF Car Parts questioned why the practice of DPF removal still exists now that cost-effective solutions are readily available for garages.

He said: “The cost of removing a DPF is likely to be more than it is to treat it with the new Vetech DPF professional cleaner.

“If you’re removing it anyway, it makes sense to treat it with this pour in product.”

Visual DPF checks became part of the MOT in February 2014 and law states that it is illegal to drive a vehicle in the UK without a DPF if it was originally designed with one.

Do you support calls for a DPF removal crackdown? How many cars have you failed during a test due to removal? Share your experiences and any concerns in the comments below.

109 Comments

  1. Supermarket fuel and people buying the wrong car is the problem.

    Reply
    • exactly what I thought. People need to do their research on google and ask some respectable mechanics

      Reply
  2. Supermarket fuel and people buying the wrong car is the problem.

    Reply
    • exactly what I thought. People need to do their research on google and ask some respectable mechanics

      Reply
  3. Make diesels more expensive to run get people to switch back to petrol.

    Reply
    • Hardly fair on the honest diesel users out there, I’d of just suggested harsher punishment and destruction of said cars found to have the DPF removed, the more you discourage it the less people will want to do it.

      Reply
    • Why hide behind your anonymous label then talk rubbish. Why should we all pay a penalty for bad government legislation which promoted diesels for so long? The whole DPF concept is flawed and it is not the answer. There are far better solutions out there but the government won’t promote them for some reason, maybe they want to maintain tax revenue.

      Reply
      • Well said peter we have a DPF/EGR deleted van which is now returning at least an extra 10 miles to the gallon and is more drive frindly less down changes etc so the whole DPF argument is not genuine, in the US there is a theory that DPFs were fitted to stop the use of Bio Diesel in favour of normal middle eastern oil supplies

        Reply
  4. Make diesels more expensive to run get people to switch back to petrol.

    Reply
    • Hardly fair on the honest diesel users out there, I’d of just suggested harsher punishment and destruction of said cars found to have the DPF removed, the more you discourage it the less people will want to do it.

      Reply
    • Why hide behind your anonymous label then talk rubbish. Why should we all pay a penalty for bad government legislation which promoted diesels for so long? The whole DPF concept is flawed and it is not the answer. There are far better solutions out there but the government won’t promote them for some reason, maybe they want to maintain tax revenue.

      Reply
  5. If manufactures reduced the prices of their DPF’s than more people would replace them! Cleaners are a waste of time and so are cheap pattern filters!!

    Reply
  6. If manufactures reduced the prices of their DPF’s than more people would replace them! Cleaners are a waste of time and so are cheap pattern filters!!

    Reply
  7. Yes vehicle should have some sort of pollution help but I have seen many many dpf’s fail with a clean and regeneration been done. They still fail even with cars that been serviced properly, and had the dpf fluid done as well and at the cost of £500-£1000 for a quality dpf a lot of people cant afford that sort of cost. Should return to old style catalytic converters for diesel again as they give lower emissions and can be cleaned and replaced a lot cheaper than your average dpf.

    Reply
  8. Yes vehicle should have some sort of pollution help but I have seen many many dpf’s fail with a clean and regeneration been done. They still fail even with cars that been serviced properly, and had the dpf fluid done as well and at the cost of £500-£1000 for a quality dpf a lot of people cant afford that sort of cost. Should return to old style catalytic converters for diesel again as they give lower emissions and can be cleaned and replaced a lot cheaper than your average dpf.

    Reply
  9. About time, I still find it perplexing that government and all the ‘greenies’ keep banging the drum for clean air and lobbying for an ever continuing reduction in greenhouse gasses and particle reduction. Yet the DfT have done nothing about the monitoring of diesel exhaust emissions since Euro 4. Come on government and replace the departments if you legislate of support a European legislation or directive at least enforce. It’s amazing that European human rights directive is upheld allowing all sorts of perpetrators to get off Scott free yet pollution which affects so many is allowed to continue!!
    Just on another issue though this is a country where the perpetrated has far fewer rights than the perpetrator!!!! Rant over.

    Reply
  10. About time, I still find it perplexing that government and all the ‘greenies’ keep banging the drum for clean air and lobbying for an ever continuing reduction in greenhouse gasses and particle reduction. Yet the DfT have done nothing about the monitoring of diesel exhaust emissions since Euro 4. Come on government and replace the departments if you legislate of support a European legislation or directive at least enforce. It’s amazing that European human rights directive is upheld allowing all sorts of perpetrators to get off Scott free yet pollution which affects so many is allowed to continue!!
    Just on another issue though this is a country where the perpetrated has far fewer rights than the perpetrator!!!! Rant over.

    Reply
  11. Map maf iat same sensor mostly these days. Just filling peoples heads of fear. Dpf removal allows engine to breathe and get fumes out quicker. Diesels are scrap anyway. Diesel should be commercial use only. Not in cars.

    Reply
    • Really??? My last 4 cars were diesel,I have now diesel with DPF, no probs at all, tailpipes clean like new and I will not change for petrol…what You saying about diesel engines I might say about petrol but… Everyone buys what they want

      Reply
  12. Map maf iat same sensor mostly these days. Just filling peoples heads of fear. Dpf removal allows engine to breathe and get fumes out quicker. Diesels are scrap anyway. Diesel should be commercial use only. Not in cars.

    Reply
    • Really??? My last 4 cars were diesel,I have now diesel with DPF, no probs at all, tailpipes clean like new and I will not change for petrol…what You saying about diesel engines I might say about petrol but… Everyone buys what they want

      Reply
  13. About time something was done to put a stop to all these people removing the dpf. These are there for a reason and removing them is illegal. Would like to know who is responsible for when the public are fined and who will take the fine.

    Reply
    • Funny how people that offer cleaning services hate the removers!! Couldn’t afford the equipment to remove could you? So your on a cleaning franchise lol Aslong as the software is done correctly there should be no issue with extra emissions (as tested many of times ourselves).

      Reply
      • I have put this to the test with two cars same year, same engine, one with DPF, one without, surprise surprise the one with no DPF had a lower emission reading, maybe the problem lies with the manufacturers mapping!

        Reply
        • me to two vans one with one without guess what the van without is cleaner at the MOT also and extra 10mpg, that tells me something is amiss

          Reply
  14. About time something was done to put a stop to all these people removing the dpf. These are there for a reason and removing them is illegal. Would like to know who is responsible for when the public are fined and who will take the fine.

    Reply
    • Funny how people that offer cleaning services hate the removers!! Couldn’t afford the equipment to remove could you? So your on a cleaning franchise lol Aslong as the software is done correctly there should be no issue with extra emissions (as tested many of times ourselves).

      Reply
      • I have put this to the test with two cars same year, same engine, one with DPF, one without, surprise surprise the one with no DPF had a lower emission reading, maybe the problem lies with the manufacturers mapping!

        Reply
  15. Although the dpf filters more particles from the exhaust filters with the target to reduce deaths from air pollution it seems like a false economy.

    During a dpf regeneration, which burns the collected particles periodically, it releases a finer material which is absorbed into the blood stream. In highly congested areas such as Manchester and London this would logically lead to an increase in blood poisoning related deaths thereby merely reducing deaths in one area to another area.

    Surely the dft and government should be looking into this rather than railroading the utilisation of dpf systems with promises of reduced deaths, tax breaks and a cleaner, safer environment.

    Reply
  16. Although the dpf filters more particles from the exhaust filters with the target to reduce deaths from air pollution it seems like a false economy.

    During a dpf regeneration, which burns the collected particles periodically, it releases a finer material which is absorbed into the blood stream. In highly congested areas such as Manchester and London this would logically lead to an increase in blood poisoning related deaths thereby merely reducing deaths in one area to another area.

    Surely the dft and government should be looking into this rather than railroading the utilisation of dpf systems with promises of reduced deaths, tax breaks and a cleaner, safer environment.

    Reply
  17. The main issue with dpf filters is the unreliability of the filters and the massive cost of replacing them if they were as cheap as a standard exhaust part it would be less of a issue 90% of the time cleaning them doesn’t work or only works for a short period of time they should just get rid of them altogether.

    Reply
  18. The main issue with dpf filters is the unreliability of the filters and the massive cost of replacing them if they were as cheap as a standard exhaust part it would be less of a issue 90% of the time cleaning them doesn’t work or only works for a short period of time they should just get rid of them altogether.

    Reply
  19. Whilst this is very well and correct in theory, but who is it that makes the general public aware of the everyday increasing extortionate maintenance and repair costs of a modern diesel? Take for example a Mazda 6. A nice used example can be picked up for £2000, then some slightly out of range injectors, a slow reacting MAF or clogged EGR block the DPF. Is a struggling family who have purchased this £2k car then meant to spend a further £2-3k on the DPF and a set of injectors that are not actually causing a running issue?
    We had an X3 in our workshop some weeks ago with a blocked DPF, BMW only part at £2,500 + vat and 9 hours labour. The initial fault was an £80 sensor but the customer is not aware until system failure. Luckily we are in the position to offer DPF cleaning and get people back on the road legally.

    Reply
    • I bet in 99 per cent of cases the DPF is removed or replaced because it is the problem, the cause of it goes unfound because there is no indication on readouts the sensor could be faulty because of the involvement in ecu knowing what’s wrong not how it became wrong.. MAP files from manufacturers should be challenged, most of the remaps and removals I know of have economy maps put back in place of the DPF which adds bhp and reduces its pollution along with being more economical to run so people can better afford the upkeep with extra money to spend. Government know remapped to Eco cars use less fuel so then loose the tax from fuel sales.

      Reply
  20. Whilst this is very well and correct in theory, but who is it that makes the general public aware of the everyday increasing extortionate maintenance and repair costs of a modern diesel? Take for example a Mazda 6. A nice used example can be picked up for £2000, then some slightly out of range injectors, a slow reacting MAF or clogged EGR block the DPF. Is a struggling family who have purchased this £2k car then meant to spend a further £2-3k on the DPF and a set of injectors that are not actually causing a running issue?
    We had an X3 in our workshop some weeks ago with a blocked DPF, BMW only part at £2,500 + vat and 9 hours labour. The initial fault was an £80 sensor but the customer is not aware until system failure. Luckily we are in the position to offer DPF cleaning and get people back on the road legally.

    Reply
    • I bet in 99 per cent of cases the DPF is removed or replaced because it is the problem, the cause of it goes unfound because there is no indication on readouts the sensor could be faulty because of the involvement in ecu knowing what’s wrong not how it became wrong.. MAP files from manufacturers should be challenged, most of the remaps and removals I know of have economy maps put back in place of the DPF which adds bhp and reduces its pollution along with being more economical to run so people can better afford the upkeep with extra money to spend. Government know remapped to Eco cars use less fuel so then loose the tax from fuel sales.

      Reply
  21. We just call in the local mobile TerraClean guy. He has a great tool which really works to clean the soot out, the customers are happy too as they are not having to replace expensive units. All done at our garage! AG

    Reply
    • Exactly what we do if we ever have any problems. My local guy Mike comes round and sorts it out for me using this TC tool. Good guy, good kit.

      Reply
  22. We just call in the local mobile TerraClean guy. He has a great tool which really works to clean the soot out, the customers are happy too as they are not having to replace expensive units. All done at our garage! AG

    Reply
    • Exactly what we do if we ever have any problems. My local guy Mike comes round and sorts it out for me using this TC tool. Good guy, good kit.

      Reply
  23. I’ve had my DPF replaced less than a month ago, surprisingly it failed last week on the MOT (emissions) when I checked the car over turned out the DPF I’d just paid a fortune to have replaced had been put in wrong and damaged…. yet people like me are persicuted and tared with the same brush as the itiots who simply remove them. It’s hardly fair to charge so much for something simple and expect the lesser minority to afford it.. it’s essentially telling some people they’re too broke to drive

    Reply
  24. I’ve had my DPF replaced less than a month ago, surprisingly it failed last week on the MOT (emissions) when I checked the car over turned out the DPF I’d just paid a fortune to have replaced had been put in wrong and damaged…. yet people like me are persicuted and tared with the same brush as the itiots who simply remove them. It’s hardly fair to charge so much for something simple and expect the lesser minority to afford it.. it’s essentially telling some people they’re too broke to drive

    Reply
  25. The issue is and will always be cost over education. License mechanics like gas engineers and it will close all the cheap cowboy garages leaving quality garages to fit parts that are correct to OE specs not the cheap rubbish they are forced to buy in order to stay in business.

    Reply
  26. The issue is and will always be cost over education. License mechanics like gas engineers and it will close all the cheap cowboy garages leaving quality garages to fit parts that are correct to OE specs not the cheap rubbish they are forced to buy in order to stay in business.

    Reply
  27. Its a waste of time having a DPF I have seen new cars which clogg up with low mileages. I think it is another money maker for the government and the car manufactures.

    Reply
  28. Its a waste of time having a DPF I have seen new cars which clogg up with low mileages. I think it is another money maker for the government and the car manufactures.

    Reply
  29. Cleaners don’t work! How is it doing anything for the environment when you have to drive at 3500rpm+ once a week to clean the DPF? Force regens produce massive amounts of smoke and amp; emissions! It’s a nonsense part same as egr valves.
    DPF removal plus side –
    Save over £1000.
    No extra smoke or emissions (if software done correctly).
    More mpg & power.
    No need to regen once a week.
    No future problems (limp mode, which is dangerous driving at 70mph and all power suddenly drops off).
    Any vehicle in regen mode produces four times more emissions than a vehicle with a DPF removed! Government are so thick. Only go off what’s on paper not what it is in real world! Do a test on a vehicle in force regen mode and amp; a vehicle with DPF removed (correctly with correct software) then see how good a DPF is.

    Reply
    • Exactly what I always say!! All the DPF does is hold in the soot and throw it out elsewhere in bulk when doing a re-gen!! stupid really!

      Reply
    • How do you keep bore temp down to stop NOX gasses without an egr valve?

      Reply
  30. Cleaners don’t work! How is it doing anything for the environment when you have to drive at 3500rpm+ once a week to clean the DPF? Force regens produce massive amounts of smoke and amp; emissions! It’s a nonsense part same as egr valves.
    DPF removal plus side –
    Save over £1000.
    No extra smoke or emissions (if software done correctly).
    More mpg & power.
    No need to regen once a week.
    No future problems (limp mode, which is dangerous driving at 70mph and all power suddenly drops off).
    Any vehicle in regen mode produces four times more emissions than a vehicle with a DPF removed! Government are so thick. Only go off what’s on paper not what it is in real world! Do a test on a vehicle in force regen mode and amp; a vehicle with DPF removed (correctly with correct software) then see how good a DPF is.

    Reply
    • Exactly what I always say!! All the DPF does is hold in the soot and throw it out elsewhere in bulk when doing a re-gen!! stupid really!

      Reply
  31. Perfect example. Mercedes Sprinter pre DPF engines would last up to 400- 500k.
    2006 onwards Sprinter serviced correctly and engines typically fail at 160-200k.
    What effect has this on the environment ?? When engines fail pouring oil into the road and drainage system, and smoke into the atmosphere. Then the effects of manufacturing engines and cost to the end user ???
    I would also like to see results of vehicle emissions whilst vehicle is carrying out regen.

    Reply
  32. Perfect example. Mercedes Sprinter pre DPF engines would last up to 400- 500k.
    2006 onwards Sprinter serviced correctly and engines typically fail at 160-200k.
    What effect has this on the environment ?? When engines fail pouring oil into the road and drainage system, and smoke into the atmosphere. Then the effects of manufacturing engines and cost to the end user ???
    I would also like to see results of vehicle emissions whilst vehicle is carrying out regen.

    Reply
  33. Nothing but yet another money making scheme by the government!
    My estate car has a DPF but the tax price is identical to the same vehicle in hatchback form, so how does that work?
    The estate versions are never capable of the mpg the hatchback versions get as well so that can only be down to the DPF……nothing but a scam!

    If everyone commenting here defending the DPF has ever witnessed a regeneration, I’m sure you would agree is a horrible process and the fumes are horrendous!

    Reply
  34. Nothing but yet another money making scheme by the government!
    My estate car has a DPF but the tax price is identical to the same vehicle in hatchback form, so how does that work?
    The estate versions are never capable of the mpg the hatchback versions get as well so that can only be down to the DPF……nothing but a scam!

    If everyone commenting here defending the DPF has ever witnessed a regeneration, I’m sure you would agree is a horrible process and the fumes are horrendous!

    Reply
  35. Why not just make the DPF with a replaceable cartridge filter so it can be changed at service intervals?

    Reply
  36. Why not just make the DPF with a replaceable cartridge filter so it can be changed at service intervals?

    Reply
  37. I question the future of modern diesels, when the Euro emissions gets stricter every time raising the bar for the manufacturers to meet them. The emission control is so complex now not to mention the other things that come with diesels. They’re okay when the vehicle is newer but at higher mileage all these things start to become problematic. You might be saving money with good mpg but potentially they’ll cost you a lot in the end.
    DPF, EGR, common rail fuel system, variable vane turbo, glow plugs, fuel additives, stop-start, not to mention dual mass flywheels. It’s a lot to go wrong and usually does. As a mechanic I’ll avoid a modern diesel and stick with petrol and try and keep the miles down.

    Reply
  38. I question the future of modern diesels, when the Euro emissions gets stricter every time raising the bar for the manufacturers to meet them. The emission control is so complex now not to mention the other things that come with diesels. They’re okay when the vehicle is newer but at higher mileage all these things start to become problematic. You might be saving money with good mpg but potentially they’ll cost you a lot in the end.
    DPF, EGR, common rail fuel system, variable vane turbo, glow plugs, fuel additives, stop-start, not to mention dual mass flywheels. It’s a lot to go wrong and usually does. As a mechanic I’ll avoid a modern diesel and stick with petrol and try and keep the miles down.

    Reply
  39. Please tell me how this ‘DPF’ reduces emissions? All it does is collect the stuff from the engine, then depending on what system is fitted to the engine it over fuels and burns away the stuff in DPF. All the emissions you save with a DPF just goes back out of the exhaust when you over fuel and burn it away, food for thought.

    Reply
  40. Please tell me how this ‘DPF’ reduces emissions? All it does is collect the stuff from the engine, then depending on what system is fitted to the engine it over fuels and burns away the stuff in DPF. All the emissions you save with a DPF just goes back out of the exhaust when you over fuel and burn it away, food for thought.

    Reply
  41. I don’t know what gives them the right to enforce anything like this after the VW emissions saga that just seems to have gone away. No difference in my opinion.

    Reply
  42. I don’t know what gives them the right to enforce anything like this after the VW emissions saga that just seems to have gone away. No difference in my opinion.

    Reply
  43. The manufactures need to make DPF’s which last longer than their warranty! It’s not fair on drivers having to splash out thousands to fix them all the time!
    The DPF removal market is huge and the number of cars and vans on the road with them deleted is going to be massive!

    Reply
  44. The manufactures need to make DPF’s which last longer than their warranty! It’s not fair on drivers having to splash out thousands to fix them all the time!
    The DPF removal market is huge and the number of cars and vans on the road with them deleted is going to be massive!

    Reply
  45. Utterly useless piece of kit creating more back pressure and more strain on the engine. More pollution towards climate change comes from cows (methane) than from cars.

    Reply
  46. Utterly useless piece of kit creating more back pressure and more strain on the engine. More pollution towards climate change comes from cows (methane) than from cars.

    Reply
  47. There is no argument if the legislation is that your vehicle should have DPF fitted then so be it. I work for a company and we do hundreds of cleans while on the vehicle and it is proven by to be very successful. The important factor is to find the reason for the failure.
    Again though the general public put cost first prior to health issues!

    Reply
    • The garage I work in has a customers 2010 Ford Mondeo. The owner is a friend of mine, as it happens, drives 60 miles a day on A roads (30 to work, 30 home again) and has limp mode and 3 codes (checked using each of the scan tools we have) 2 relate to the DPF directly. Soot accumulated and DPF Blocked. the 3rd P24A4 is unknown to Ford, the Scan tool manufacturers OR Google etc.. so would you mind explaining to someone who is time served with 25 years experience in the trade, how we can POSSIBLY remedy this fault permanently, when there are no fault codes other than DPF ones, the Live Data for injectors, Maf, boost etc are all within the specs we have seen on other identical cars without the issues, etc. are you saying that this customer should be left with having to replace the DPF every couple of months? or would you get rid of the DPF in his situation? Even the main dealer (we specialise) cant find an issue, which is why we are trying (lower labour rate etc) all responses are much appreciated.

      Reply
      • Having had a 2.0 tdci mondeo and being a ford tech I’ve came across this on my own 130000 mile car and others, 2 rubber pipes off the dpf to the bulkhead sensor brake up, suck in or just crumble away, either way you need to replace those, some times the sensor also. You then need ids to do a forced regen because it hasn’t been able to do one. Some times 2 regens with a little driving between them. If you can’t get an ids system you can buy a modified elm lead that works both high and median canbus and instal forscan and it will give you a regen option in tools.

        Reply
  48. There is no argument if the legislation is that your vehicle should have DPF fitted then so be it. I work for a company and we do hundreds of cleans while on the vehicle and it is proven by to be very successful. The important factor is to find the reason for the failure.
    Again though the general public put cost first prior to health issues!

    Reply
    • The garage I work in has a customers 2010 Ford Mondeo. The owner is a friend of mine, as it happens, drives 60 miles a day on A roads (30 to work, 30 home again) and has limp mode and 3 codes (checked using each of the scan tools we have) 2 relate to the DPF directly. Soot accumulated and DPF Blocked. the 3rd P24A4 is unknown to Ford, the Scan tool manufacturers OR Google etc.. so would you mind explaining to someone who is time served with 25 years experience in the trade, how we can POSSIBLY remedy this fault permanently, when there are no fault codes other than DPF ones, the Live Data for injectors, Maf, boost etc are all within the specs we have seen on other identical cars without the issues, etc. are you saying that this customer should be left with having to replace the DPF every couple of months? or would you get rid of the DPF in his situation? Even the main dealer (we specialise) cant find an issue, which is why we are trying (lower labour rate etc) all responses are much appreciated.

      Reply
      • Having had a 2.0 tdci mondeo and being a ford tech I’ve came across this on my own 130000 mile car and others, 2 rubber pipes off the dpf to the bulkhead sensor brake up, suck in or just crumble away, either way you need to replace those, some times the sensor also. You then need ids to do a forced regen because it hasn’t been able to do one. Some times 2 regens with a little driving between them. If you can’t get an ids system you can buy a modified elm lead that works both high and median canbus and instal forscan and it will give you a regen option in tools.

        Reply
  49. Because DPF filters are required by law, it should be lawful for the car manufacture to oversee the maintaince of the filter, covering any cost for repairs or replacement.

    Reply
  50. Because DPF filters are required by law, it should be lawful for the car manufacture to oversee the maintaince of the filter, covering any cost for repairs or replacement.

    Reply
  51. What a joke the price of dpf filters are a joke and even a original dpf filter clogs up within 60/80 thousand miles and Because the government are just trying to find other ways to con motorists they expect u to pay £500/£2000 for a new one like people got that money just another way to scam every one.

    Reply
  52. What a joke the price of dpf filters are a joke and even a original dpf filter clogs up within 60/80 thousand miles and Because the government are just trying to find other ways to con motorists they expect u to pay £500/£2000 for a new one like people got that money just another way to scam every one.

    Reply
  53. Hitting the motorist again…. Easy target…. :-((

    Reply
  54. Hitting the motorist again…. Easy target…. :-((

    Reply
  55. This is why I will be voting OUT on June 23rd.

    Reply
    • What difference will that make?! Unless you’re planning on boycotting all European manufacturers?

      Reply
  56. This is why I will be voting OUT on June 23rd.

    Reply
    • What difference will that make?! Unless you’re planning on boycotting all European manufacturers?

      Reply
  57. It’s all about looking after your motor, regular service and use good quality fuel! Have a fuel treatment, run through when serviced I do all this and on my last MOT, my emissions are too clean to test.

    Reply
  58. It’s all about looking after your motor, regular service and use good quality fuel! Have a fuel treatment, run through when serviced I do all this and on my last MOT, my emissions are too clean to test.

    Reply
  59. DPFs are utter rubbish, same as egr valves, all they do is gum and clog everything up. I’ve removed mine and getting loads better mpg and the car runs loads better. I just put back in for MOT, then off again.

    Reply
  60. DPFs are utter rubbish, same as egr valves, all they do is gum and clog everything up. I’ve removed mine and getting loads better mpg and the car runs loads better. I just put back in for MOT, then off again.

    Reply
  61. As some have stated above DPF’s do just dump all the collected soot when they regenerate. But the point is supposed to be that, due to conditions required for a regeneration to happen, this will be on an open stretch of road rather than emitting the soot in built up areas. But of course this whole theory collapses when people seldom drive on an open stretch of road. Hence the number of DPF problems we all see. The simple fact is that modern diesels are built for motorway use. If you don’t spend much time on motorways then don’t buy one! But all that aside most of the removed DPF’s I’ve come across are with people who don’t care about emissions but are after more performance, like the de-catted petrol cars. I doubt if they notice any real difference but they kid themselves they do. Also, how can it be illegal to remove a DPF but apparently legal to advertise that you will? That has got me wondering!

    Reply
    • You’ve obviously never driven a remapped car – unbelievable difference on a diesel, so much torque. My mpg rose from low 40’s to high 50’s with a remap. Could beat all the type r’s rx8 etc in a diesel vrs. Still got my dpf in but only makes them better without.

      Reply
  62. As some have stated above DPF’s do just dump all the collected soot when they regenerate. But the point is supposed to be that, due to conditions required for a regeneration to happen, this will be on an open stretch of road rather than emitting the soot in built up areas. But of course this whole theory collapses when people seldom drive on an open stretch of road. Hence the number of DPF problems we all see. The simple fact is that modern diesels are built for motorway use. If you don’t spend much time on motorways then don’t buy one! But all that aside most of the removed DPF’s I’ve come across are with people who don’t care about emissions but are after more performance, like the de-catted petrol cars. I doubt if they notice any real difference but they kid themselves they do. Also, how can it be illegal to remove a DPF but apparently legal to advertise that you will? That has got me wondering!

    Reply
    • You’ve obviously never driven a remapped car – unbelievable difference on a diesel, so much torque. My mpg rose from low 40’s to high 50’s with a remap. Could beat all the type r’s rx8 etc in a diesel vrs. Still got my dpf in but only makes them better without.

      Reply
  63. Remove the DPF, map the car correctly and it’ll perform better in a test than the car with a DPF.

    You’ll see better MPG and the car will pull much better… no brainer Really.

    Remove all cats & DPF’s it’s the future ;-D

    Reply
  64. Remove the DPF, map the car correctly and it’ll perform better in a test than the car with a DPF.

    You’ll see better MPG and the car will pull much better… no brainer Really.

    Remove all cats & DPF’s it’s the future ;-D

    Reply
  65. I always remove the dpf and egr on any derv i run as these will cause 99 percent of engine faults in future use. You get better mpg and power without em to. No different to cats on cars folk been removing them and putting back in for mot then out again for years.

    Reply
  66. I always remove the dpf and egr on any derv i run as these will cause 99 percent of engine faults in future use. You get better mpg and power without em to. No different to cats on cars folk been removing them and putting back in for mot then out again for years.

    Reply
  67. I’m waiting for the tv ad ” Have you been mis sold a diesel car ” I know i have 🙁

    Reply
  68. I’m waiting for the tv ad ” Have you been mis sold a diesel car ” I know i have 🙁

    Reply
  69. what should happen is all Dealers should be made to disclose the problems of a diesel car and the parts replacement costs when a customer enquires about the purchase of one and ask the customer what kind of driving they will be doing i.e town or motorway driving see how many diesel cars they end up selling.

    Reply
  70. what should happen is all Dealers should be made to disclose the problems of a diesel car and the parts replacement costs when a customer enquires about the purchase of one and ask the customer what kind of driving they will be doing i.e town or motorway driving see how many diesel cars they end up selling.

    Reply
  71. The bottom line with tailpipe pollution is too many people making short, inappropriate journeys. I walk the school run, but one bone idle lazy mum complained to me that she has to drive because “it’s a 20 minute walk.” Well, its 10 minute drive too by the time she’s braved the traffic and orbited several times trying to park, all the time clogging her DPF and polluting my air.

    Diesels, on average, take seven miles to get to full operating temperature, the point at which combustion becomes truly efficient and the DPF can regenerate if required. If you’re regularly doing journeys of less than that in a diesel you’ve a) bought the wrong car and b) are lazy.

    Reply
  72. The bottom line with tailpipe pollution is too many people making short, inappropriate journeys. I walk the school run, but one bone idle lazy mum complained to me that she has to drive because “it’s a 20 minute walk.” Well, its 10 minute drive too by the time she’s braved the traffic and orbited several times trying to park, all the time clogging her DPF and polluting my air.

    Diesels, on average, take seven miles to get to full operating temperature, the point at which combustion becomes truly efficient and the DPF can regenerate if required. If you’re regularly doing journeys of less than that in a diesel you’ve a) bought the wrong car and b) are lazy.

    Reply
  73. I bought a 07 Suzuki GV DDIS and the first thing I did was remove the dpf reprogrammed it correctly and did a smoke correction to the system and now I get a much better mpg no limp mode no warning lights better performance all round and the emissions are better than my wife’s 2012 diesel focus zetec s, and it only cost me £250, now I know a lot of cleaners are charging £150 just for a clean and it beats paying £1000/£2000 for a new system.

    Reply
  74. I bought a 07 Suzuki GV DDIS and the first thing I did was remove the dpf reprogrammed it correctly and did a smoke correction to the system and now I get a much better mpg no limp mode no warning lights better performance all round and the emissions are better than my wife’s 2012 diesel focus zetec s, and it only cost me £250, now I know a lot of cleaners are charging £150 just for a clean and it beats paying £1000/£2000 for a new system.

    Reply
  75. Is this yet more scaremongering aimed at the motorist, everywhere you now read we are all living longer, could this be down to the diesel fumes we are breathing

    Reply
  76. Is this yet more scaremongering aimed at the motorist, everywhere you now read we are all living longer, could this be down to the diesel fumes we are breathing

    Reply
  77. I run all my diesels with their DPF’s removed. They’re nothing but an expensive time bomb. At least the manufacturers could have made them a lot more serviceable instead of one piece systems, then you’d have less folks removing them.
    Same shit happened after ’92 when I worked in the only place in Scotland removing catalysts. Audi for example wanted £900 for an 80 down pipe with the cat when the poor flange rusted away. We removed/made swappable the cats for £100.
    The government screwed petrol prices then everyone bought diesels when they all became turbo’ now they’ve debatably caused themselves through greed new issues they then insist manufacturers must rectify buy these ilconceived bolt on ‘solutions’ that have a very short term life and practical use.
    Rip them out

    Reply
  78. I run all my diesels with their DPF’s removed. They’re nothing but an expensive time bomb. At least the manufacturers could have made them a lot more serviceable instead of one piece systems, then you’d have less folks removing them.
    Same shit happened after ’92 when I worked in the only place in Scotland removing catalysts. Audi for example wanted £900 for an 80 down pipe with the cat when the poor flange rusted away. We removed/made swappable the cats for £100.
    The government screwed petrol prices then everyone bought diesels when they all became turbo’ now they’ve debatably caused themselves through greed new issues they then insist manufacturers must rectify buy these ilconceived bolt on ‘solutions’ that have a very short term life and practical use.
    Rip them out

    Reply
  79. i am fed up with this money making country, if you get rid of diesel car the world will not survive on just petrol and electric. the goverment should tell car companies thay that all dpf exhaust should be the same size and one fits all, that way the part of the said exhaust would be cheap to replace and the dpf removel problem will be gone, lack of clean air is worldwide. we were told to buy diesel cars because it was better, this car tax system is also crap money making scam, what difference to the enverioment going to do by me paying more car tax.

    Reply
  80. i am fed up with this money making country, if you get rid of diesel car the world will not survive on just petrol and electric. the goverment should tell car companies thay that all dpf exhaust should be the same size and one fits all, that way the part of the said exhaust would be cheap to replace and the dpf removel problem will be gone, lack of clean air is worldwide. we were told to buy diesel cars because it was better, this car tax system is also crap money making scam, what difference to the enverioment going to do by me paying more car tax.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Have your say!

17 0

Lost Password

Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.